Posts Tagged ‘Thermostat’

Programmable thermostats allow your home to maintain pre-set temperature levels that are customized to your personal comfort levels. They are typically more convenient, aw well as more accurate, than manual thermostats, and can help cut-down on energy bills.

Most homes will see the return on a programmable thermostat investment in about one year. When used correctly, programmable thermostats can help you save about $150 each year. The programming allows you to set the thermostat so that it is only in use when you are at home, cutting down on unnecessary air conditioner use and energy use.

The program feature is perfect for homeowners who are not at home during the day and have a varied schedule on the weekend. They can be personalized to your schedule, so that the temperature adjusts in the morning when you wake up, at night when you go to sleep, or during the day while you are away.

Programmable thermostats automatically store scheduled settings and repeat them on a daily basis. Most programmable thermostats offer a full week’s worth of scheduling, so you can set a different schedule for each day of the week and weekends. They can also be manually set, so that you can override the programming at your convenience.

The scheduling allowed with programmable thermostats gives you the convenience of never having to worry about turning your AC off before you leave the home or on when you return. It also provides the convenience of having the temperature set at a point that is comfortable for you and your family.

And, not only are they easy to use, they’re also easy on the eye. With an attractive, streamlined design, our thermostats will fit beautifully into any home’s décor.

If you would like to make the switch to a programmable thermostat, please contact us or reach out to us on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

Are you having some problems with you air conditioner? We are going to go over the common problems according to Kudzu and explain how you can fix them. It is always a good idea to remember that you should have your system serviced annually by a qualified HVAC technician, and you should use such a technician to resolve any home air conditioning problems where the cause and solution are not both obvious. Also, we recommend that you read through your HVAC manual, to familiarize yourself with your specific unit.


Your AC Unit is not Cooling:
This is the most obvious sign that something is not working properly. Make sure that your thermostat is properly set a few degrees cooler than room temperature and make sure it is switched to the “cool” setting. Once you’ve determined that it is not a simple switch error, turn off your system. It may need to be cleaned. Start by removing any debris, twigs, dirt etc on and around it. Sometimes dirt can be restricting the air flow. If these simple steps do not resolve the issue, it would be best to call an HVAC technician.

Clean Filters: Your air conditioning system needs clean filters in order to run properly and efficiently. A filter collects all the dust and allergens from incoming air in order to keep the air in your home clean. We recommend that you change these filters every couple of months. If you do not, the filter will no longer be able to collect dust, forcing your system to work extra hard, which could lead to a breakdown.

If you are facing air conditioning problems that do not have an obvious cause or solution, we highly recommended that you call an HVAC technician. It is always better to be safe then sorry! If you have any questions please feel free to ask in the comment box below or on our Facebook and Twitter pages!

It is a good idea to know how your heating system actually works, seeing how you pay those bills every month! To understand them better, first, you need to determine what type of system you are using in your home. Here is the basic breakdown from Kudzu.

Natural Gas: It is carried into your appliances such as your furnace or gas stove. Propane gas is usually found in a tank somewhere outside your home and it carriers the gas through pipes underneath your home.

Electric Furnace: The best way to describe it is like a toaster. It heats the house like a toaster heats up bread.

Heat Pumps: This is an energy efficient alternative to a furnace. A heat pump will move air from one place to another, trying to evenly distribute the heat or cool air, depending on the season. Since they move heat, instead of generating heat, they are able to provide up to four times the energy they consume, pretty cool huh?

Hot Water & Steam Heaters: They are basically the same thing. They both have a boiler which heats up the water and then gets sent through the pies as steam.

Forced Air: This is the most common heating system. You set your thermostat and wheels begin to turn, well not really. The furnace heats up the air in the chamber and then blows it through duct work and registers throughout your home. Thermostats are a great investment, and an easy way to save money.

Hopefully, now that you have a better understanding of how heating systems work, you can choose one that fits your lifestyle or budget! Remember thermostats and heat pumps are huge money savers and a great investment! Always consult an HVAC professional to get the best heating system to fit your home!

Thermostats have sure come a long way since the old programmable ones we grew up with.  Thermostats are now offered in digital, programmable and non-programmable with the needs of the individual in mind.  They’re now designed to maximize the performance of heating and air conditioning systems using accurate temperature control.  They are also designed to meet ENERGY STAR requirements when appropriate coils are used. The best part is they are Thermo at Casteel Heating and Coolingextremely easy to use and appealing to the eye (ask Thermo).  Thermostats come in a streamlined design and you don’t have to worry about it not blending in with your home decor.

Trane is offering a new high definition programmable thermostat this year and will be the most advanced home comfort device on the market.  The thermostat has a high-definition color touch screen and will serve as an easy-to-use central planning center with features that help keep you comfortable inside, prepare you for the weather outside, and help manage home energy-efficiency.  As technology advances so do HVAC systems.  Be sure to ask Casteel Heating and Cooling about our thermostats!

A basic thermostat works by tripping a switch that sends power to a furnace or air compressor to begin the combustion process. Find out about the mercury switch inside of a thermostat with help from a home remodeling specialist in this free video on thermostats.


How Does a Thermostat Work? — powered by eHow.com

William Perkinson is a partner with Perkinson Building Corporation, based in Birmingham, Ala. He has over 20 years of experience specializing in remodeling, additions, and home repair. Perkinson is a graduate of the University of Alabama, and is licensed, bonded and insured.

Read more: William Perkinson | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/members/ev_ebff42ad-97a9-4fc0-9598-9e759e115379.html#ixzz10NxdVzsG

When it’s cold, we walk over and turn up the thermostat, and when it is hot, we walk over and turn on the air conditioner to cool us down. But, how does that little box on the wall actually control the temperature of our homes or offices?

A mechanical thermostat is actually a very simple device. It is basically a thermometer attached to a switch that turns on your heater, whether your heat source is natural gas or electricity. If you remove the cover of your thermostat, you will see the inner workings and get a better idea of how a thermostat works.

The top layer holds a mercury switch and a thermometer coil. The mercury switch is just a small vial filled with the liquid metal, mercury. Within this vial are three wires: one at the bottom of the vial; one at the left of the vial; and one at the right of the vial. As the temperature rises or cools, the vial of mercury gets tipped to the right or the left making the corresponding wire come into contact with the wire that runs along the bottom. If the mercury gets tipped to the left, a connection is made that creates a current that energizes a relay, which starts the heater and circulation fan. As the room heats up, the vial levels off and once that is in balance, the connection is broken causing the heater to turn off. If the mercury switch is tilted to the right, another relay causes the air conditioner to turn on.

Casteel Heating and CoolingWhat tips the vial in either direction is the thermometer coil that rests against the vial of mercury. The thermometer coil is constructed of a bi-metallic strip made of two different types of metal, usually copper and iron, which are bonded together. Because the different metals respond to heat at different levels, this strip contracts and expands causing the coil to curl up or uncurl as the temperature changes. This curling or uncurling motion tilts the mercury vial, which then signals the heating source to kick off or on. When you adjust the temperature knob on your thermostat, you are actually adjusting the tightness of the coil.

Beneath the top layer of your thermostat, you will see the circuit board, which houses the wires that actually lead to the circulation fan and heat source. The circuit board is connected to the mercury switch via a metal screw and wire, which “reads” the switch and turns on the appropriate heating or cooling device.

Newer on the market are digital thermostats. These thermostats differ from the mechanical thermostats in that they use a thermistor, a resistor whose electrical resistance changes with temperature. The microcontroller in a digital thermostat measures the resistance and converts that number to a temperature reading. Digital thermostats can save energy because they can be programmed to turn the heat or air conditioning off or on at preset times throughout the day. For example, you can set the air conditioning to come on an hour before you come home from work, or have the heater remain off during the hours while you work and then turn on an hour before you get back so your home is warm and cozy when you open the door.

Article cited: http://www.wisegeek.com/how-does-a-thermostat-work.htm